Dec 08 2011

Culture: Schleck brothers doc to reveal the ‘real’ Andy and Fränk

Published by at 01:32 under Articles,English,PTD

SOURCE: http://www.352luxmag.lu/index.php?p=edito&id=15772

Culture: Schleck brothers doc to reveal the ‘real’ Andy and Fränk

The Road Uphill from director Jean-Louis Schuller follows the cyclists through the arduous 2011 season and in particular the Tour de France.
Luxembourg. One of the world’s smallest countries, a green and peaceful place bordered by Belgium, France, and Germany. The birthplace of two brothers, Andy and Fränk Schleck, two of the world’s best professional cyclists. National heroes and the sportsmen that their country had been waiting for, Leopard Trek, the new Luxembourgish team built around Andy and Fränk were the favourites to win the 2011 Tour de France. (PTD)

The Road Uphill is billed as an ‘intimate cinematic portrait of two brothers and a team who are under pressure to live up to the expectations of their country’. Documenting the relationships, motivations and belief systems integral to Leopard Trek – the core aspect of the team that is not usually exposed by the lens of television reportage.

Speaking to Paul Thiltges at Paul Thiltges Distributions & PTD Studio, it becomes quickly apparant that this project was one that is very important to him, not just as producer but as a fan, “I have six kids, and all of them adore the Schleck’s. Personally, I am from an older generation and was a follower of ‘Father Schleck’ (Johny) but I love what they do for Luxembourg and what they do for cycling.”

Following Leopard Trek and the Schleck Brothers, the new documentary by director Jean-Louis Schuller focuses upon the team’s participation in the prestigious 2011 Tour de France and upon their physical and mental preparation for the biggest cycling event in the world.

Schuller addresses the problems one faces when in a team with ones brother, and competing at the highest (literally) level, he aks ‘does their compassion for one another make them stronger and enable them to overcome greater physical limits?’

Investigating and deconstructing the day-to-day life of this ‘professional cycling team and the physical, mental and emotional thresholds that they need to overcome to win the greatest race on earth’, The Road Uphill delivers a more relatable account of what and who truly motivates these sporting greats.

Thiltges hope for The Road Uphill is to provide a better understanding of who the Schleck’s are, what they go through to do what they do. “It was important for me,” Thiltges says, “that Luxembourgers, who feel they ‘know’ all about Andy and Fränk to be shown a different side. To really get to know what makes them tick.”

According to Thiltges, the project came about by coincidence. Having worked with Fränk on a Tango advertisment when the older Schleck was competing in the Tour de France alone, Thiltges hit upon the idea of a documentary. A year passed with many discussions involving the sports council, RTL and Team Leopard Trek before they were granted the access they required for a year-in-the-life of the Schleck Bros. Thiltges was most scared of “getting in the way of their training, annoying them, or ruining their concentration,” but the results speak for themselves.

“I just hope that we can allow the Luxembourgish audience to really see and appreciate what it is that the Schleck’s do for their sport.”

www.ptd.lu

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SOURCE: http://www.352luxmag.lu/index.php?p=edito&id=15772

Culture: Schleck brothers doc to reveal the ‘real’ Andy and Fränk

The Road Uphill from director Jean-Louis Schuller follows the cyclists through the arduous 2011 season and in particular the Tour de France.
Luxembourg. One of the world’s smallest countries, a green and peaceful place bordered by Belgium, France, and Germany. The birthplace of two brothers, Andy and Fränk Schleck, two of the world’s best professional cyclists. National heroes and the sportsmen that their country had been waiting for, Leopard Trek, the new Luxembourgish team built around Andy and Fränk were the favourites to win the 2011 Tour de France. (PTD)

The Road Uphill is billed as an ‘intimate cinematic portrait of two brothers and a team who are under pressure to live up to the expectations of their country’. Documenting the relationships, motivations and belief systems integral to Leopard Trek – the core aspect of the team that is not usually exposed by the lens of television reportage.

Speaking to Paul Thiltges at Paul Thiltges Distributions & PTD Studio, it becomes quickly apparant that this project was one that is very important to him, not just as producer but as a fan, “I have six kids, and all of them adore the Schleck’s. Personally, I am from an older generation and was a follower of ‘Father Schleck’ (Johny) but I love what they do for Luxembourg and what they do for cycling.”

Following Leopard Trek and the Schleck Brothers, the new documentary by director Jean-Louis Schuller focuses upon the team’s participation in the prestigious 2011 Tour de France and upon their physical and mental preparation for the biggest cycling event in the world.

Schuller addresses the problems one faces when in a team with ones brother, and competing at the highest (literally) level, he aks ‘does their compassion for one another make them stronger and enable them to overcome greater physical limits?’

Investigating and deconstructing the day-to-day life of this ‘professional cycling team and the physical, mental and emotional thresholds that they need to overcome to win the greatest race on earth’, The Road Uphill delivers a more relatable account of what and who truly motivates these sporting greats.

Thiltges hope for The Road Uphill is to provide a better understanding of who the Schleck’s are, what they go through to do what they do. “It was important for me,” Thiltges says, “that Luxembourgers, who feel they ‘know’ all about Andy and Fränk to be shown a different side. To really get to know what makes them tick.”

According to Thiltges, the project came about by coincidence. Having worked with Fränk on a Tango advertisment when the older Schleck was competing in the Tour de France alone, Thiltges hit upon the idea of a documentary. A year passed with many discussions involving the sports council, RTL and Team Leopard Trek before they were granted the access they required for a year-in-the-life of the Schleck Bros. Thiltges was most scared of “getting in the way of their training, annoying them, or ruining their concentration,” but the results speak for themselves.

“I just hope that we can allow the Luxembourgish audience to really see and appreciate what it is that the Schleck’s do for their sport.”

www.ptd.lu

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