Jun 06 2011

Runway released on June 10th in Ireland

Published by at 01:00 under Articles,English

SOURCE: http://entertainment.ie/movie_review/The+Runway/7609.htm

Based on a true story (kind of), The Runway is a delightful children’s adventure comedy-drama with lashings of heart and humour.

It’s 1983 and a recession hit Drumasheen, Co. Cork is like a ghost town with locals having little to do but hang about waiting for something to happen. Something does happen in the shape of a crashing plane, piloted by Columbian Ernesto (Bichir, Ché). He’s taken in by Paco (Kearns), an honest kid forced to live the latchkey life because his single mother (Condon) works odd hours. Told that his father ‘lives in Spain’, Paco sees a kinship in Ernesto and pulls the town together to help him get back in the air – by building a runway. However, Ernesto has reasons to vamos other than merely getting home…

Written and directed by Ian Power, The Runway has the spirit of ET pumping through it. If ET was Elliot’s surrogate father, an alien being who would do anything to protect him, that’s exactly what Ernesto is to Paco. Like Spielberg’s modern classic, the relationship is based on fear and wonder at first but as the two get to know each other they learn they have a lot in common – and not just their love for Condon, which adds a little spice to the scenes set at home. They compliment each other perfectly: Paco’s pidgin Spanish is just enough to communicate with his ward and we get the impression that Ernesto wouldn’t be chatty in his native language anyway. They get by with gestures and a sixth sense for knowing what the other is thinking (although sometimes Paco makes up what he wants Ernesto to say). Watching this relationship develop is charming.

ET isn’t the only influence, though, as Power aims to treat Drumasheen as the Coen Brothers treated Fargo; The Runway is filled with oddball characters but the writer-director stops just short of having a sneaky laugh at the people that inhabit the sleepy community. Although Mayor Carmoddy (a delightful Crowley) might be a figure of fun with his small-town attitude, and his double act with local Gardai Pat Laffan (The Snapper’s Burgess) throws up a few giggles, his purpose is never for pure comedy. Carmoddy and co. work hard to swing The Runway from comedy to drama when the story needs it.

Ian Power looks like he could be one for the future.

THE RUNWAY REVIEW
By Ferg on 5/31/2011 05:03:00 PM ****, Movie Reviews
Irish cinema is completely saturated with woeful war stories about the loss of love, innocence, family and country. Too many times has the blood soaked story of the Easter Rising been told on our screens. With each new widely released Irish production comes more dreary tales of days gone by. There are many common themes and styles that reverberate through the annals of Irish film, but have we ever had a really great Irish comedy? Better yet, has there ever been a heartwarming, uplifting tale of love, friendship and adventure? Well, now there is.

The Runway tells the ‘kind of’ true story of Paco (Jamie Kierans), a young boy who encounters a crashed pilot one faithful night in Mallow in 1983. The mysterious pilot, Ernesto (Demian Bichir), is taken in by Paco and his mother where they awkwardly try to communicate as to where he’s come from. When it all becomes clear, the townspeople of Mallow decide to help this strange visitor get back in the air by fixing his battered plane. As the town gets to work, Paco finds that, while they speak different languages, he has a true friend in Ernesto.

Written and directed by Ian Power, the beauty of The Runway lies in it’s simplicity. With tight pacing, great dialogue, relatable characters and genuinely funny set pieces, it’s hard not to be whisked away by the film. Everything is simple. Rather than be caught up in the fantastical, Power has grounded his film, making it accessable to pretty much any audience. The Runway is the type of film where you get just as much emotion, laughter or excitment from the back-and-forth conversation of two characters. This proves especially true with Paco and Ernesto. The two characters are mismatched in about every way; Paco’s a little Irish boy whereas Ernesto is a hardened Columbian pilot. Yet, when the two share a scene together it’s often highly emotional or funny. The chemistry between the actors is wonderful.

A special mention must be made for the soundtrack to the film. Not just comprised of Irish tunes (although they do squeeze in some stuff by U2), scattered throughout The Runway you’ll hear early Jazz, Pop and Rock classics. Of course, as I’ve learned previously, the choice of music means nothing if it’s poorly placed or too contrasting with the action of screen (I’m looking at you, London Boulevard), but Power and his editing team skillfully arrange each to fit like a glove.

There isn’t much to fault here. The Runway is skillfully written, performed and directed by a wonderful team of homegrown and foreign talent. As I said above, it’s light-hearted entertainment at it’s finest; funny, exciting and, best of all, it’s uplifting. The Runway is guaranteed to put a smile on your face when leaving the cinema. Er, that is unless you were expecting another Irish film about the Easter Rising.

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SOURCE: http://entertainment.ie/movie_review/The+Runway/7609.htm

Based on a true story (kind of), The Runway is a delightful children’s adventure comedy-drama with lashings of heart and humour.

It’s 1983 and a recession hit Drumasheen, Co. Cork is like a ghost town with locals having little to do but hang about waiting for something to happen. Something does happen in the shape of a crashing plane, piloted by Columbian Ernesto (Bichir, Ché). He’s taken in by Paco (Kearns), an honest kid forced to live the latchkey life because his single mother (Condon) works odd hours. Told that his father ‘lives in Spain’, Paco sees a kinship in Ernesto and pulls the town together to help him get back in the air – by building a runway. However, Ernesto has reasons to vamos other than merely getting home…

Written and directed by Ian Power, The Runway has the spirit of ET pumping through it. If ET was Elliot’s surrogate father, an alien being who would do anything to protect him, that’s exactly what Ernesto is to Paco. Like Spielberg’s modern classic, the relationship is based on fear and wonder at first but as the two get to know each other they learn they have a lot in common – and not just their love for Condon, which adds a little spice to the scenes set at home. They compliment each other perfectly: Paco’s pidgin Spanish is just enough to communicate with his ward and we get the impression that Ernesto wouldn’t be chatty in his native language anyway. They get by with gestures and a sixth sense for knowing what the other is thinking (although sometimes Paco makes up what he wants Ernesto to say). Watching this relationship develop is charming.

ET isn’t the only influence, though, as Power aims to treat Drumasheen as the Coen Brothers treated Fargo; The Runway is filled with oddball characters but the writer-director stops just short of having a sneaky laugh at the people that inhabit the sleepy community. Although Mayor Carmoddy (a delightful Crowley) might be a figure of fun with his small-town attitude, and his double act with local Gardai Pat Laffan (The Snapper’s Burgess) throws up a few giggles, his purpose is never for pure comedy. Carmoddy and co. work hard to swing The Runway from comedy to drama when the story needs it.

Ian Power looks like he could be one for the future.

THE RUNWAY REVIEW
By Ferg on 5/31/2011 05:03:00 PM ****, Movie Reviews
Irish cinema is completely saturated with woeful war stories about the loss of love, innocence, family and country. Too many times has the blood soaked story of the Easter Rising been told on our screens. With each new widely released Irish production comes more dreary tales of days gone by. There are many common themes and styles that reverberate through the annals of Irish film, but have we ever had a really great Irish comedy? Better yet, has there ever been a heartwarming, uplifting tale of love, friendship and adventure? Well, now there is.

The Runway tells the ‘kind of’ true story of Paco (Jamie Kierans), a young boy who encounters a crashed pilot one faithful night in Mallow in 1983. The mysterious pilot, Ernesto (Demian Bichir), is taken in by Paco and his mother where they awkwardly try to communicate as to where he’s come from. When it all becomes clear, the townspeople of Mallow decide to help this strange visitor get back in the air by fixing his battered plane. As the town gets to work, Paco finds that, while they speak different languages, he has a true friend in Ernesto.

Written and directed by Ian Power, the beauty of The Runway lies in it’s simplicity. With tight pacing, great dialogue, relatable characters and genuinely funny set pieces, it’s hard not to be whisked away by the film. Everything is simple. Rather than be caught up in the fantastical, Power has grounded his film, making it accessable to pretty much any audience. The Runway is the type of film where you get just as much emotion, laughter or excitment from the back-and-forth conversation of two characters. This proves especially true with Paco and Ernesto. The two characters are mismatched in about every way; Paco’s a little Irish boy whereas Ernesto is a hardened Columbian pilot. Yet, when the two share a scene together it’s often highly emotional or funny. The chemistry between the actors is wonderful.

A special mention must be made for the soundtrack to the film. Not just comprised of Irish tunes (although they do squeeze in some stuff by U2), scattered throughout The Runway you’ll hear early Jazz, Pop and Rock classics. Of course, as I’ve learned previously, the choice of music means nothing if it’s poorly placed or too contrasting with the action of screen (I’m looking at you, London Boulevard), but Power and his editing team skillfully arrange each to fit like a glove.

There isn’t much to fault here. The Runway is skillfully written, performed and directed by a wonderful team of homegrown and foreign talent. As I said above, it’s light-hearted entertainment at it’s finest; funny, exciting and, best of all, it’s uplifting. The Runway is guaranteed to put a smile on your face when leaving the cinema. Er, that is unless you were expecting another Irish film about the Easter Rising.

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