Apr 24 2010

Ten easy pieces…

Published by at 14:42 under Articles,English

SOURCE: http://www.paperjam.lu – Brian Power

DE CALIGARI À TARANTINO CHARTS THE HISTORY OF CINEMA IN TEN LESSONS. CREATORS CLAUDE BERTEMES AND GIAN MARIA TORE EXPLAIN…

“The 21st Century has seen a change in the pattern of cinematic knowledge. It has flattened out. We want to bring the sense of cinematic history back,” says Claude Bertemes, director of the Cinémathèque, on the series De Caligari à Tarantino, a course which aims to chart the history of cinema in ten lectures, each of which is followed by finger food and the screening of a signature film from the relevant era. While the Cinémathèque is hosting the series, with each event occurring on the final Monday of each month up until March 2011, it has come about in partnership with the University of Luxembourg.
The name acts as a canny summary of the programme’s goals and ambitions: “People can watch Pulp Fiction, which is a neo-noir film, yet know nothing of film noir. Awareness of such relationships can enhance the pleasure of film. Then, if you also know that film-noir is something of an answer to German Expressionism, of which one of the masterpieces is The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, it boosts the pleasure even more. The links are there, and the information works both ways,” smiles Bertemes.

“It was also our idea to consider cinema as a whole, though,” adds Gian Maria Tore, researcher and lecturer in Media Semiotics at the University. “While we aim to show the parallels, we also want to highlight the differences. Cinema is obviously not only Tarantino, Asian Cinema… We want to see the diversity, and place the unknown on the same platform as the known.”

The lectures are in French, and will be given by a wide-ranging group with very different approa ches. “Some may be concerned with aesthe tics of cinema,” explains Tore, “others could be concer ned with history, economics or sociological aspects.” The series is manifestly not about fusty academia, however. “It’s like a game, the format we’re taking,” he continues, “the fun of learning. It’s open for everyone, but people get a certificate at the end if they subscribe to the full programme!” The spirit is friendly and convivial, and the events should become social gatherings for participants from all walks of life. “It’s not about the view from the ivory tower. We want to showcase the film industry beyond popcorn cinema, but in an atmosphere of joy and playfulness,” insists Bertemes.

As well as the main screening, films from each of the chosen eras and genres will be screened on the Sundays following the lecture, until the following Monday, all of which will give an overall picture of the lessons and cinema in general.

On 29 March, the lecture will cover the origins of the film industry and its language, in a talk entitled From Italian Peplum to the World of Hollywood, while the showcase film will be D.W. Griffith’s Broken Blossoms (1919). For more information on special offers, tickets, future lectures and screenings, see www.caligaritarantino.lu .

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SOURCE: http://www.paperjam.lu – Brian Power

DE CALIGARI À TARANTINO CHARTS THE HISTORY OF CINEMA IN TEN LESSONS. CREATORS CLAUDE BERTEMES AND GIAN MARIA TORE EXPLAIN…

“The 21st Century has seen a change in the pattern of cinematic knowledge. It has flattened out. We want to bring the sense of cinematic history back,” says Claude Bertemes, director of the Cinémathèque, on the series De Caligari à Tarantino, a course which aims to chart the history of cinema in ten lectures, each of which is followed by finger food and the screening of a signature film from the relevant era. While the Cinémathèque is hosting the series, with each event occurring on the final Monday of each month up until March 2011, it has come about in partnership with the University of Luxembourg.
The name acts as a canny summary of the programme’s goals and ambitions: “People can watch Pulp Fiction, which is a neo-noir film, yet know nothing of film noir. Awareness of such relationships can enhance the pleasure of film. Then, if you also know that film-noir is something of an answer to German Expressionism, of which one of the masterpieces is The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, it boosts the pleasure even more. The links are there, and the information works both ways,” smiles Bertemes.

“It was also our idea to consider cinema as a whole, though,” adds Gian Maria Tore, researcher and lecturer in Media Semiotics at the University. “While we aim to show the parallels, we also want to highlight the differences. Cinema is obviously not only Tarantino, Asian Cinema… We want to see the diversity, and place the unknown on the same platform as the known.”

The lectures are in French, and will be given by a wide-ranging group with very different approa ches. “Some may be concerned with aesthe tics of cinema,” explains Tore, “others could be concer ned with history, economics or sociological aspects.” The series is manifestly not about fusty academia, however. “It’s like a game, the format we’re taking,” he continues, “the fun of learning. It’s open for everyone, but people get a certificate at the end if they subscribe to the full programme!” The spirit is friendly and convivial, and the events should become social gatherings for participants from all walks of life. “It’s not about the view from the ivory tower. We want to showcase the film industry beyond popcorn cinema, but in an atmosphere of joy and playfulness,” insists Bertemes.

As well as the main screening, films from each of the chosen eras and genres will be screened on the Sundays following the lecture, until the following Monday, all of which will give an overall picture of the lessons and cinema in general.

On 29 March, the lecture will cover the origins of the film industry and its language, in a talk entitled From Italian Peplum to the World of Hollywood, while the showcase film will be D.W. Griffith’s Broken Blossoms (1919). For more information on special offers, tickets, future lectures and screenings, see www.caligaritarantino.lu .

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