Sep 16 2011

When your garden is your life

Published by at 01:46 under Articles,English,Samsa

SOURCE: http://web.wort.lu/wort/web/en/culture/articles/2011/09/161385/index.php

(JB) Allotments have a reputation for being sleepy places where often retired people with time on their hands tend tomatoes and other fruit and vegetables.

A new documentary about the phenomenon sets out not so much to challenge this stereotype. Rather, it portrays these idyllic hidden little corners of Luxembourg for what they are and reveals the characters who nurture them.

“Schrebergaart,” translated as gardens, is the title of film directed by Yann Tonnar which was shot in allotments around Esch-sur-Alzette.

It is rare that residents would have a chance to see the allotments which feature in the documentary, as they are often hidden from view. However, Tonnar’s 55-minute film gives exclusive access to a handful of delightful plots, owned and tended by Portuguese, Italians and Luxembourgish pensioners and enjoyed by their families.

Against the backdrop of a contemporary culture, which is increasingly seeking locally-grown produce, the film resonates among older and younger viewers alike.

Meanwhile, the film sheds light on the migrant histories of some gardeners, one of which describes his toil with the earth as a metaphor for connecting with his roots.

The movie, which is produced by Samsa Film, arrives in Luxembourg cinemas this Friday.

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SOURCE: http://web.wort.lu/wort/web/en/culture/articles/2011/09/161385/index.php

(JB) Allotments have a reputation for being sleepy places where often retired people with time on their hands tend tomatoes and other fruit and vegetables.

A new documentary about the phenomenon sets out not so much to challenge this stereotype. Rather, it portrays these idyllic hidden little corners of Luxembourg for what they are and reveals the characters who nurture them.

“Schrebergaart,” translated as gardens, is the title of film directed by Yann Tonnar which was shot in allotments around Esch-sur-Alzette.

It is rare that residents would have a chance to see the allotments which feature in the documentary, as they are often hidden from view. However, Tonnar’s 55-minute film gives exclusive access to a handful of delightful plots, owned and tended by Portuguese, Italians and Luxembourgish pensioners and enjoyed by their families.

Against the backdrop of a contemporary culture, which is increasingly seeking locally-grown produce, the film resonates among older and younger viewers alike.

Meanwhile, the film sheds light on the migrant histories of some gardeners, one of which describes his toil with the earth as a metaphor for connecting with his roots.

The movie, which is produced by Samsa Film, arrives in Luxembourg cinemas this Friday.

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