Sep 22 2008

“Léif Lëtzebuerger”-Premiere in London

Published by at 09:31 under Misc. Luxembourg

SOURCE: www.wort.lu

Luxemburg dankt der BBC
“Léif Lëtzebuerger”-Premiere in London

(FeMo) – “A Royal at War” – “Léif Lëtzebuerger”. Der Film, eine britisch -luxemburgische Koproduktion, erzählt von den Exiljahren von Großherzogin Charlotte im Zweiten Weltkrieg.

Am vergangenen Freitag feierte der Film in London Premiere. Die Erstaufführung in der englischen Hauptstadt fand in in einem Festsaal der “British Academy of Film and Television Arts” statt. Großherzog Henri, Großherzogin Maria Teresa und Erbgroßherzog Guillaume waren zusammen mit Staatssekretärin Octavie Modert nach England gereist.

Im Rahmen der Premierenfeier bedankte sich Großherzog Henri auch bei der BBC . Die “British Broadcasting Corporation” hatte es während des Zweiten Weltkrieges Großherzogin Charlotte ermöglicht, sich via Radio aus dem britischen Exil in luxemburgischer Sprache an die Luxemburger zu richten.

Am Freitag überreichte Großherzog Henri eine Nachbildung der Place-Clairefontaine -Statue von Großherzogin Charlotte an M. Olexiy Solohubenko, Chefredakteur von BBC World.

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SOURCE: www.wort.lu

Luxemburg dankt der BBC
“Léif Lëtzebuerger”-Premiere in London

(FeMo) – “A Royal at War” – “Léif Lëtzebuerger”. Der Film, eine britisch -luxemburgische Koproduktion, erzählt von den Exiljahren von Großherzogin Charlotte im Zweiten Weltkrieg.

Am vergangenen Freitag feierte der Film in London Premiere. Die Erstaufführung in der englischen Hauptstadt fand in in einem Festsaal der “British Academy of Film and Television Arts” statt. Großherzog Henri, Großherzogin Maria Teresa und Erbgroßherzog Guillaume waren zusammen mit Staatssekretärin Octavie Modert nach England gereist.

Im Rahmen der Premierenfeier bedankte sich Großherzog Henri auch bei der BBC . Die “British Broadcasting Corporation” hatte es während des Zweiten Weltkrieges Großherzogin Charlotte ermöglicht, sich via Radio aus dem britischen Exil in luxemburgischer Sprache an die Luxemburger zu richten.

Am Freitag überreichte Großherzog Henri eine Nachbildung der Place-Clairefontaine -Statue von Großherzogin Charlotte an M. Olexiy Solohubenko, Chefredakteur von BBC World.

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4 responses so far

4 Responses to ““Léif Lëtzebuerger”-Premiere in London”

  1. adminon 06 Oct 2008 at 11:15

    Film profiles exiled royal whose speeches inspired occupied nation
    Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 08:00
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    The wartime broadcasts of Grand Duchess Charlotte of Luxembourg were beacons of hope to her beleaguered people during the dark days of World War II, but it took a chance meeting on a Somerset railway station to bring her story to the cinema screen.

    When the Nazis invaded neutral Luxembourg on May 10 1940 the royal family and the Government fled to raise awareness of the people’s plight among the Allies.

    The Nazis regarded the little state as German territory, ordered the population to speak German, deported Jews to concentration camps, and ordered young Luxembourgers to serve in the German Army or Labour camps.

    Gustav Simon, the Nazi-appointed Gauleiter reported directly to Hitler and after a General Strike in 1942 instituted a reign of terror which saw thousands arrested, tortured, killed or sent to camps.

    As families feared every knock on the door, and men went into hiding rather than fight for the enemy, one calm voice borne over the airwaves kept hope alive. Broadcasting via the BBC’s World Service the Grand Duchess Charlotte became a “propagandist in pearls”, telling the population the whole world knew of their suffering and there was no doubt of the final outcome.

    Producer Candice Allen, remembered her grandmother, a Luxembourger, telling her how much those broadcasts meant. In a chance meeting on Castle Cary railway station she told film producer Lynn Rothwell that she had always wanted to retell the story on film.

    Now together with Ray Tostevin, of Yeovil-based Grace Productions, they have brought the story to the screen in a feature-length documentary which has had an international British Academy of Film and Television Arts premiere in London.

    Charlotte, a Royal at War, narrated by actress Geraldine James, includes interviews with Luxembourgers who remember how she spoke: “Like a mother and a wife.”

    The Grand Duchess also carried out propaganda tours and broadcasts from the United States, winning a pledge from President Roosevelt that the US would liberate the Duchy. His eldest grandson, Curtis Roosevelt, speaks in the film of the terrible toll the liberation took of American lives –with 19,000 killed in the Battle of the Bulge, and 70,000 injured or missing. The film has brought an unexpected bonus for Mr Tostevin, who wrote and directed the film, and for producers Candice Allen and Lynn Rothwell.

    Grand Duke Henri, Luxembourg’s current head of state, and grandson of Grand Duchess Charlotte, has awarded each the ‘Chevalier de l’Ordre de Mérite Civil et Militaire d’Adolphe de Nassau’, which translated means ‘Knight of the Order of Civil and Military Merit of Adolph of Nassau’.

    Mr Tostevin said: “The award is a great honour. But there are many others in Grace’s production team who’ve worked equally hard to help pull-off this feature length history documentary film.

    “After being so well received by cinema audiences in Luxembourg, we’re now looking to secure acquisitions from broadcasters here in Britain and internationally.”

  2. adminon 06 Oct 2008 at 11:15

    Ray’s royal film earns him medal
    By Shaun Shackleton

    From the left: Prince Felix, Prince Guillaume, Grand Duchess Maria-Theresa, Grand Duke Henri, co-producers Lynn Rothwell and Candice Allen-Olson, director Ray Tostevin and Joy Hoffmann of CNA of Luxembourg at the embassy where Mr Tostevin and the co-producers of Charlotte: A Royal at War received an award. (0644704)
    GUERNSEY-born film director Ray Tostevin had a surprise as his latest documentary premiered in London. More than 200 guests attended the international London premiere of Charlotte: A Royal at War, at 195, Piccadilly, home of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts.

    The feature-length film tells the story of Charlotte, the ‘propagandist in pearls’ who through the power of radio inspired the people of Luxembourg in the face of brutal occupation by Hitler’s army.

    Charlotte’s grandson, the reigning Grand Duke Henri of Luxembourg, made a surprise presentation to the film’s director, Ray Tostevin, creative director of Somerset-based, independent Grace Productions.

    At a ceremony held at the Luxembourg Embassy before last Friday’s premiere, Mr Tostevin and co-producers Lynn Rothwell and Candice Allen, were each awarded the Chevalier de l’Ordre de Merite Civil et Militaire d’Adolphe de Nassau (Knight of the Order of Civil and Military Merit of Adolph of Nassau).

    The special medal was in recognition of their artistic work in producing a film that brought to a wider public the extraordinary story of Grand Duchess Charlotte and her propaganda broadcasts on the BBC, regarded as a ‘lifeline of hope’ by her people in tiny Luxembourg as they endured Hitler’s terror regime.

  3. adminon 06 Oct 2008 at 11:16

    A FILM producer will see the documentary she made about the legendary life of the Grand Duchess of Luxembourg during WW2 appear on the silver screen in front of Royalty next week.

    Charlotte: A Royal at War, which was co-produced by Lynn Rothwell from Harpenden, will have its international premiere at the BAFTA (British Academy for Television and Arts) HQ in London on Friday September 19.

    The film, titled Léif Lëtzebuerger in Luxembourg, charts the Grand Duchess Charlotte’s time in exile during WW2 when she made renowned broadcasts to her people from a BBC studio in England.

    It has already premiered in Luxembourg and the country’s Royal Family were said to be overwhelmed by the film, which delves into an important part of their history and lifts the lid on many of its aspects.

    Duchess Charlotte, who died in 1985, was the grandmother of the country’s current Duke who will be attending the international premiere with his wife, the current Grand Duchess of Luxembourg.

    The Duchess of Gloucester will also be in attendance representing the Queen and a reception will follow at the Luxembourg Embassy.

    Lynn Rothwell of GRACE Productions, the company which made the film, embarked on the project more than three-years-ago following a chance meeting with her co-producer, Candice Allen, at a railway station to which she had been diverted due to a landslide on the track.

    When Candice, who was originally from a news background but expressed an interest in documentary making, met up with Lynn and GRACE Productions director Ray Tostevin, she pitched her idea for the film.

    They have not looked back since and Lynn and Candice have travelled the world over searching for rare footage and finding people to interview about the Duchess’s story, which turned out to have much more to it than they had originally anticipated.

    As well as gaining a lot of attention from the Luxembourg Royal Family, the country’s Secretary of State for Culture, Higher Education and Research, Octavie Modert, also got involved with the film and she has been key in arranging the premiere in London.

    The film has been translated into an English version with narration by Geraldine James, who has completed films including Calendar Girls and Jewel in the Crown.

    Lynn is not the film’s only local connection – the Duchess was played by Jo Coleman, a performer for the St Albans and Harpenden Light Operatic Societies, and her hair for the film was styled by Harpenden’s Capelli Cutting Company.

    A Harpenden based cameraman also travelled with Lynn to conduct an interview in Ireland and sponsors of the film include Luxembourg-based satellite group SES whose senior vice-president, John Purvis, lives in Harpenden.

  4. adminon 06 Oct 2008 at 11:16

    Red Carpet Treatment for a Royal War Story

    Posted on: Friday, 19 September 2008, 00:00 CDT

    By Peter Harrison

    A westcountry production company will be given the red carpet treatment tomorrow at an international premiere.

    The Somerset-based media company, Grace Productions, will see the international premiere of the film Charlotte: A Royal At War. The 98- minute film follows the story of Grand Duchess Charlotte of Luxembourg. During her wartime exile, Charlotte and her government waged an international battle to regain freedom for occupied Luxembourg.

    The film shows how she used her radio broadcasts on the BBC from London, and NBC in America, to bring messages of hope to her compatriots who endured five years of bitter occupation by Hitler’s armies.

    Attending tomorrow’s premiere screening at the BAFTA cinema on Piccadilly, in London’s West End, will be the Grand Duke and Grand Duchess of Luxembourg and the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, representing the British Royal family. The event is being jointly hosted by the Luxembourg Embassy and Grace Productions.

    The documentary film, in part, was shot in Somerset, using locals as extras. The county was chosen for its similarity to Luxembourg.

    Director Ray Tostevin said: “The wooded hillsides and meadows at Ham Hill are very similar to the Luxembourg countryside. So we re- staged part of the Grand Duchess’ escape sequence – as the German invasion was under way in May 1940 – here in Somerset.

    “We contacted Haynes Motor Museum at Sparkford to hire a suitable vehicle and driver. And we also had great help from the staff at the Manor Hotel in Yeovil, who let us use their bridal suite to recreate inside Luxembourg’s Royal palace.”

    He said: “Charlotte’s radio broadcasts were filmed in a specially recreated 1940s studio at BBC Bush House, while the scenes showing those who listened in secret were filmed at a radio museum in south London.”

    The documentary has already received rave reviews in Luxembourg. The international version, to be screened tomorrow, is narrated by British actress and TV star Geraldine James.

    The film follows the story of how Grand Duchess Charlotte highlighted the plight of Luxembourg on the world stage and won the support of leaders including President Roosevelt, with whom she had a close friendship.

    The film features Curtis Roosevelt, FDR’s eldest grandson, as he walked through rows of crosses in a US military cemetery in Luxembourg and speaking of the loss of 19,000 American troops in the Battle of the Bulge, fought on Luxembourg soil, in December 1944.

    (c) 2008 Western Morning News, The Plymouth (UK). Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.

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