Mar 15 2011

25th London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, 2011 | So So Gay

Published by at 01:47 under Festival

With George Osborne swinging the axe to bring down Britain’s budget deficit, the arts world has been rocked to the core by a 25 per cent cut to the Department for Culture Media and Sport. We all know that the UK Film Council – responsible for this year’s Oscar-magnet, The King’s Speech – is soon, pointlessly and sadly, to meet Charles I’s fate. Another £2.4 million of the required £500 million savings will come from a 15 per cent cut to the British Film Institute (BFI), the fantastic organisation responsible for, among other things, the enduringly popular London Lesbian & Gay Film Festival. Now in its 25th year, celebrations could be muted by the fact that 2011 sees the festival cut in half, running for one week instead of its customary fortnight.

The Festival’s team is, however, stoical in the face of what could seem like a hefty slap in the face, and it’s promising to stage the best Festival yet. So So Gay director Caspar Aremi and I were lucky enough to be able to attend last week’s launch reception, and we can attest to the LLGFF’s success in picking a truly exciting line-up. The Festival kicks off on 31 March with Kaboom, a sci-fi comedy drama set around a group of college kids waking up to their sexualities. Highlights include the French love triangle drama, Heartbeats (1 April) and an achingly sexy Luxembourgish film, House of Boys (1 and 2 April), featuring some of the most flexible male dancers I’ve ever clapped eyes on.

There’s also a strong showing from the lesbian film world, with creepy noir Owls (3 and 6 April) lining up with a stylish French 1960s-set thriller, Gigola (2 and 4 April) and a preview of the BBC’s visually stunning adaptation of Sarah Waters’ wartime love story, The Night Watch (4 April). If forced to pick a favourite, I’d have to say I’ll be battering at the doors to see Becoming Chaz (1 April), the moving biopic about Chaz Bono’s transition from female to male, which wowed the crowds at Sundance. With such a strong line up you’d be forgiven for concluding that the Festival isn’t actually much smaller than before; it’s cramming an incredible amount of quality into one week. Take a look at the LLGFF’s website for the full programme. Tickets go on sale on 11 March for BFI members.

Here at So So Gay we can’t wait to get stuck in to the Festival, and to mark the build up we’re going to be running a series of reviews of our personal favourite LGBT films – starting this evening with the classic British thriller, Victim. We’re sure you’ve your own favourites too; if you’d like to nominate a film, and to write it up, drop us a line and we’ll pick our favourite nominations to run in the last week of March.

I hope your spring gets off to as bouncy a start as mine!

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With George Osborne swinging the axe to bring down Britain’s budget deficit, the arts world has been rocked to the core by a 25 per cent cut to the Department for Culture Media and Sport. We all know that the UK Film Council – responsible for this year’s Oscar-magnet, The King’s Speech – is soon, pointlessly and sadly, to meet Charles I’s fate. Another £2.4 million of the required £500 million savings will come from a 15 per cent cut to the British Film Institute (BFI), the fantastic organisation responsible for, among other things, the enduringly popular London Lesbian & Gay Film Festival. Now in its 25th year, celebrations could be muted by the fact that 2011 sees the festival cut in half, running for one week instead of its customary fortnight.

The Festival’s team is, however, stoical in the face of what could seem like a hefty slap in the face, and it’s promising to stage the best Festival yet. So So Gay director Caspar Aremi and I were lucky enough to be able to attend last week’s launch reception, and we can attest to the LLGFF’s success in picking a truly exciting line-up. The Festival kicks off on 31 March with Kaboom, a sci-fi comedy drama set around a group of college kids waking up to their sexualities. Highlights include the French love triangle drama, Heartbeats (1 April) and an achingly sexy Luxembourgish film, House of Boys (1 and 2 April), featuring some of the most flexible male dancers I’ve ever clapped eyes on.

There’s also a strong showing from the lesbian film world, with creepy noir Owls (3 and 6 April) lining up with a stylish French 1960s-set thriller, Gigola (2 and 4 April) and a preview of the BBC’s visually stunning adaptation of Sarah Waters’ wartime love story, The Night Watch (4 April). If forced to pick a favourite, I’d have to say I’ll be battering at the doors to see Becoming Chaz (1 April), the moving biopic about Chaz Bono’s transition from female to male, which wowed the crowds at Sundance. With such a strong line up you’d be forgiven for concluding that the Festival isn’t actually much smaller than before; it’s cramming an incredible amount of quality into one week. Take a look at the LLGFF’s website for the full programme. Tickets go on sale on 11 March for BFI members.

Here at So So Gay we can’t wait to get stuck in to the Festival, and to mark the build up we’re going to be running a series of reviews of our personal favourite LGBT films – starting this evening with the classic British thriller, Victim. We’re sure you’ve your own favourites too; if you’d like to nominate a film, and to write it up, drop us a line and we’ll pick our favourite nominations to run in the last week of March.

I hope your spring gets off to as bouncy a start as mine!

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