May 24 2009

A Town Called Panic in Variety

Published by at 14:25 under Festival,Industry

source: http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117940350.html?categoryid=31&cs=1 – By LESLIE FELPERIN

Panique au Village (Animated — Belgium – France -Luxembourg)

An antic little joy ride through the imagination of Belgian outfit Pic Pic Andre, stop-motion animation “A Town Called Panic” proves you don’t need fancy CGI techniques, 3-D, or stunt voice casting to make a sparkly little gem. Co-helmers Stephane Aubier and Vincent Patar’s first feature, a spin-off of their same-named TV series, goes off a surreal adventure with Plasticine pals Cowboy, Indian and Horse involving piano lessons, tractors, and mechanical penguins. Distinctly offbeat and European in its sensibility, “Town” will struggle to attract residents expecting mainstream fare, but will appeal to sophisticated kids and inner-child-nurturing adults as a niche release.

  Belgian and French auds will be most familiar with pic’s characters and world via series of five-minute films originally broadcast on Canal Plus, although show has been dubbed into Brit-accented English by “Wallace and Gromit” producer Aardman and shown offshore on cable stations (such as Nicktoons in the U.S.) and further disseminated through the Internet.

  Offering a distinctive blend of whimsy, slapstick violence and manic energy, the “Town Called Panic” universe pivots round a deliberately random-looking collection of small figurines — cowboys and Indians rub shoulders with farmers and policemen — that look like the kind of cheap toys kids buy with their allowance. (The plastic and resin-based figurines look mass-manufactured but are actually made for the show and pic itself.)

Animated with deliberate jerkiness, their antics resemble the imaginary games slightly twisted 8-year-olds play when adults aren’t looking. Tone is more innocent than “South Park” or “Monty Python’s Flying Circus,” but definitely darker than “Pingu,” although all are touchstones, among others.

Plot in current feature revolves around main characters Cowboy (voiced by co-helmer Stephane Aubier) and Indian (Bruce Ellison) attempting to build a barbeque as a birthday present for their friend Horse (co-helmer Vincent Patar). A keyboard accident while Internet shopping results in the delivery of 50 million bricks instead of 50, which end up crushing the threesome’s house and creates a minor inconvenience for the gang’s shouty neighbor Steven (Benoit Poelvoorde, “Man Bites Dog”).

Meanwhile, Horse is pitching woo to comely local piano teacher Madame Longree (Jeanne Balibar“Va Savoir”). Unfortunately, his efforts are frustrated when he’s forced to pursue, along with Cowboy and Indian, some bizarre sea creatures who keep stealing Horse’s newly built walls. Don’t even ask how a mechanical penguin gets in on the act.

First half-hour or so is chockfull of good gags spiced with slightly more adult humor, particularly sequence showing Horse’s birthday party where everyone gets a little too drunk and merry. Halfway through though, energy starts to flag somewhat, and filmmakers’ lack of experience in writing feature-length scripts shows.

Nevertheless, pic remains appealing to the end and was particularly warmly received at press screening in Cannes, perhaps for repping such light relief after over a week’s worth of heavier, gorier fare. Punky soundtrack by Dionysos and French Cowboy adds punch.

Camera (color), Jan Vandenbussche; editor, Anne-Laure Guegan; music, Dionysos, French Cowboy; production designer, Gilles Cuvelier; animation manger, Steven de Beul; animation, Stephane Aubier, Marion Charrier, Zoe Goetgheluck, Florence Henrard, Vincent Patar, creation of plastic and resin figures, Marion Charrier, Zoe Goetgheluck; sound editor (Dolby Digital, DTS), Fred Piet; sound designer, Valene Leroy. Reviewed at Cannes Film Festival (noncompeting), May 22, 2009. Running time: 75 MIN. 
Voices: Stephane Aubier, Jeanne Balibar, Veronique Dumont, Bruce Ellison, Frederic Jannin, Bouli Lanners, Vincent Patar, Benoit Poelvoorde. 

 

A La Parti Production, Beast Prods., Les Films du Grognon, RTBF Belgium Television (Belgium)/Made in Prods., Gebeka Films (France)/MelusineProductions (Luxumbourg) production, with the support of the Centre du Cinema et de l’Audiovisuel de la Communaute Francaise de Belgique et des Teledistributeurs wallons, Vlaams Audiovisueel Fonds, Fonds National de Soutien a la production audiovisuelle du Grand-Duche de Luxembourg, Tax Shelter du Gouvernement Federal de Belgique, Region Wallonne/Wallimage, MEDIA program, Canal+, Canal+ Horizons. (International sales: The Coproduction Office, Paris.) Produced by Philippe Kaufmann, Vincent Tavier. Co-producers, Marc Bonny, Xavier Diskeuve, Vincent Eches, Stephan Roelants, Pilar Torres Villodre, Arlette Zylberberg. Directed, written by Stephane Aubier, Vincent Patar.

Comments

comments

source: http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117940350.html?categoryid=31&cs=1 – By LESLIE FELPERIN

Panique au Village (Animated — Belgium – France -Luxembourg)

An antic little joy ride through the imagination of Belgian outfit Pic Pic Andre, stop-motion animation “A Town Called Panic” proves you don’t need fancy CGI techniques, 3-D, or stunt voice casting to make a sparkly little gem. Co-helmers Stephane Aubier and Vincent Patar’s first feature, a spin-off of their same-named TV series, goes off a surreal adventure with Plasticine pals Cowboy, Indian and Horse involving piano lessons, tractors, and mechanical penguins. Distinctly offbeat and European in its sensibility, “Town” will struggle to attract residents expecting mainstream fare, but will appeal to sophisticated kids and inner-child-nurturing adults as a niche release.

  Belgian and French auds will be most familiar with pic’s characters and world via series of five-minute films originally broadcast on Canal Plus, although show has been dubbed into Brit-accented English by “Wallace and Gromit” producer Aardman and shown offshore on cable stations (such as Nicktoons in the U.S.) and further disseminated through the Internet.

  Offering a distinctive blend of whimsy, slapstick violence and manic energy, the “Town Called Panic” universe pivots round a deliberately random-looking collection of small figurines — cowboys and Indians rub shoulders with farmers and policemen — that look like the kind of cheap toys kids buy with their allowance. (The plastic and resin-based figurines look mass-manufactured but are actually made for the show and pic itself.)

Animated with deliberate jerkiness, their antics resemble the imaginary games slightly twisted 8-year-olds play when adults aren’t looking. Tone is more innocent than “South Park” or “Monty Python’s Flying Circus,” but definitely darker than “Pingu,” although all are touchstones, among others.

Plot in current feature revolves around main characters Cowboy (voiced by co-helmer Stephane Aubier) and Indian (Bruce Ellison) attempting to build a barbeque as a birthday present for their friend Horse (co-helmer Vincent Patar). A keyboard accident while Internet shopping results in the delivery of 50 million bricks instead of 50, which end up crushing the threesome’s house and creates a minor inconvenience for the gang’s shouty neighbor Steven (Benoit Poelvoorde, “Man Bites Dog”).

Meanwhile, Horse is pitching woo to comely local piano teacher Madame Longree (Jeanne Balibar“Va Savoir”). Unfortunately, his efforts are frustrated when he’s forced to pursue, along with Cowboy and Indian, some bizarre sea creatures who keep stealing Horse’s newly built walls. Don’t even ask how a mechanical penguin gets in on the act.

First half-hour or so is chockfull of good gags spiced with slightly more adult humor, particularly sequence showing Horse’s birthday party where everyone gets a little too drunk and merry. Halfway through though, energy starts to flag somewhat, and filmmakers’ lack of experience in writing feature-length scripts shows.

Nevertheless, pic remains appealing to the end and was particularly warmly received at press screening in Cannes, perhaps for repping such light relief after over a week’s worth of heavier, gorier fare. Punky soundtrack by Dionysos and French Cowboy adds punch.

Camera (color), Jan Vandenbussche; editor, Anne-Laure Guegan; music, Dionysos, French Cowboy; production designer, Gilles Cuvelier; animation manger, Steven de Beul; animation, Stephane Aubier, Marion Charrier, Zoe Goetgheluck, Florence Henrard, Vincent Patar, creation of plastic and resin figures, Marion Charrier, Zoe Goetgheluck; sound editor (Dolby Digital, DTS), Fred Piet; sound designer, Valene Leroy. Reviewed at Cannes Film Festival (noncompeting), May 22, 2009. Running time: 75 MIN. 
Voices: Stephane Aubier, Jeanne Balibar, Veronique Dumont, Bruce Ellison, Frederic Jannin, Bouli Lanners, Vincent Patar, Benoit Poelvoorde. 

 

A La Parti Production, Beast Prods., Les Films du Grognon, RTBF Belgium Television (Belgium)/Made in Prods., Gebeka Films (France)/MelusineProductions (Luxumbourg) production, with the support of the Centre du Cinema et de l’Audiovisuel de la Communaute Francaise de Belgique et des Teledistributeurs wallons, Vlaams Audiovisueel Fonds, Fonds National de Soutien a la production audiovisuelle du Grand-Duche de Luxembourg, Tax Shelter du Gouvernement Federal de Belgique, Region Wallonne/Wallimage, MEDIA program, Canal+, Canal+ Horizons. (International sales: The Coproduction Office, Paris.) Produced by Philippe Kaufmann, Vincent Tavier. Co-producers, Marc Bonny, Xavier Diskeuve, Vincent Eches, Stephan Roelants, Pilar Torres Villodre, Arlette Zylberberg. Directed, written by Stephane Aubier, Vincent Patar.

Comments

comments

6 responses so far

6 Responses to “A Town Called Panic in Variety”

  1. adminon 24 May 2009 at 14:29

    http://www.serieslive.com/news-9801-panique-au-village-en-avant-premiere-a-cannes-et-a-bruxelles.html

    Panique au village en avant-première à Cannes et à Bruxelles
    SeriesLive était à l’avant-première publique mondiale du film “Panique au Village” cette nuit à Bruxelles.
    Céline Lansman, le 22/05/2009 à 09h50

    | |

    Entre 2002 et 2003, l’équipe de Panique au village a tournée 20 épisodes de 5 minutes réalisés en “stop-motion”, c’est-à-dire en filmant l’animation image par image. Décor de campagne réel fabriqué de toutes pièces, bruitages, musique et surtout les célèbres personnages en figurines de plastique et pâte à modeler : les modèles classiques de fermiers, animaux de la ferme et surtout Cow-boy, Indien et Cheval. Des capsules qui avaient fait le bonheur des spectateurs de Canal + et de la RTBF.
    Hier soir, quelques spectateurs bruxellois privilégiés ont eu droit à une avant-première du long métrage, présenté simultanément en séance de minuit au festival de Cannes. SeriesLive était pour vous à Bruxelles, au milieu du fan club venu déguisé et très en forme.
    Dans une interview carte postale réalisée par Hugues Dayez (un des grands spécialistes belges du 7e art) en vue d’être projetée avant ce tout premier visionnage, les créateurs Vincent Patar et Stéphane Aubier expliquent qu’ils ont passé un super moment à réaliser cette mini-série et qu’ils avaient envie de développer les caractères de leurs personnages pour voir si ça pouvait tenir sur une plus longue durée.
    Et les attentes des fans et du grand public en général étaient grandes. Surtout avec une B.A. qui annonçait “plus terrifiant que Psychose, plus impressionnant que La tour infernale, plus romantique que La leçon de piano, plus bouleversant que La marche de l’empereur, plus spectaculaire que Voyage au centre de la terre” !
    Débarque donc sur notre écran un ovni délirant, avec des voix connues (Jeanne Balibar, Bouli Lanners, Benoît Poelvoorde…), des accents poussés à l’extrême du cliché, des expressions bien belges (“Purée, qué gros veau”, etc.). Et de l’humour bien sûr. Mais comment sera-t-il reçu à Cannes ? Voici les premières réactions de la presse française ce matin.
    “Poétique et drôle…” Nord Eclair
    “C’est franchement drôle et dans la lignée de la série télé homonyme diffusée sur Canal+.” Ecran Large
    “A l’arrivée, on apprend que tout ce petit monde aime les gaufres et la bière, et que les belges ne sont pas loin de leurs cousins anglais en termes d’humour. C’est plutôt une très bonne chose.” DVDrama
    “Sur la longueur, cela aurait tendance à s’essouffler un tantinet. Reste les voix qui doublent ces figurines dont l’accent belge volontairement forcé confère au film une touche définitivement foldingue.” RFI
    “C’est un petit miracle que le doux délire de Panique au village ait trouvé sa place dans le Festival.” Le Monde

    Et notre avis ? Les attentes étaient grandes depuis l’annonce de la production de ce film, trop peut-être. Si la magie des figurines en plastique fonctionne, le rythme très soutenu imposé au film peut parfois donner le tournis. En 1h22, Cowboy, Cheval et Indien vivent plus d’aventures que Jack Bauer en 7 saison de 24. S’ajoute à celà un léger problème de mixage sonore qui fait se chevaucher certains sons de manière parfois agaçante, surtout à 1h du matin.
    Mais au final, la magie a frappé et on retrouve bien la poésie de l’univers de Patar et Aubier. Certaines réplique font mouche et l’on est parfois impressionné par la technique ou par certaines trouvailles du duo. Une bonne tranche de franche rigolade à réserver à ceux qui ont apprécié la série.
    Panique au village, de Vincent Patar et Stéphane Aubier — sortie le 17 juin en Belgique, en octobre en France.
    François Jadoulle et Céline Lansman, à l’UGC De Bouckère au milieu de la nuit

  2. adminon 24 May 2009 at 14:29

    http://www.7sur7.be/7s7/fr/1777/Deborah-Laurent-envoyee-speciale-a-Cannes/article/detail/861652/2009/05/21/Poelvoorde-en-roue-libre-dans-un-Panique-au-Village-hilarant-et-absurde.dhtml

    Poelvoorde en roue libre dans un Panique au Village hilarant et absurde

    La grande foule se pressait cette après-midi aux portes de la salle qui projetait Panique au Village, de nos compatriotes, Vincent Patar et Stéphane Aubier. Les petites histoires de Panique ont pris de l’ampleur et se retrouver sur grand écran. Coboy, Indien, Cheval et leur bande voie leurs aventures s’étaler sur un peu plus d’une heure quart.

    Le duo n’a pas changé sa façon de travailler, même si désormais leurs petites figurines ont une vie en salles obscures. C’est toujours aussi drôle, bon enfant, ingénieux et complètement absurde.

    L’histoire commence le jour de l’anniversaire de Cheval. Coboy et Indien décident de lui offrir un barbecue. Pour le construire, ils n’ont besoin que d’une chose: des briques. Ils décident d’en commander sur Internet. Distraits, ils se trompent dans leur commande: au lieu d’en recevoir 50, on leur en livre 50 millions. Un petit problème logistique qui aura un effet boule de neige. Et vous verrez, quand vous découvrirez ce film, fin juin, que cette expression n’est pas choisie par hasard!

    Pour notre plus grand bonheur, les voix initiales des personnes n’ont pas changé. On retrouve toujours, dans le gosier des petits
    bonshommes, celles de Bouli Lanner, Benoit Poelvoorde et désormais aussi celle de l’actrice et chanteuse française Jeanne Balibar.

    La petite fête organisée en l’honneur de Cheval est tout simplement fabuleuse. Steven Russel, qui parle, ou hurle, invective plutôt, avec la voix de Poelvoore affonne bière sur bière jusqu’à tomber raide et ensuite à se battre avec Gendarme. Poelvoorde s’en donne à coeur joie et il fait bien.

    Les scènes matinales, de douche notamment, sont particulièrement réussies. Mais où vont-ils chercher tous ces détails hilarants?

    Panique au Village est surréaliste et pas prise de tête pour un sou. On salue l’énergie et la douce folie des créateurs. Comme il fallait s’y attendre cependant l’histoire s’essoufle un peu sur la fin. Mais si ce n’est que ça…

    Déborah Laurent

  3. adminon 24 May 2009 at 14:30

    http://www.rtbf.be/info/societe/cinema/panique-au-village-cannois-110501

    Arrivée en tracteur de “Panique au village” à Cannes
    Place à l’humour au Festival de Cannes
    22.05.09 – 21:07 Le Festival de Cannes a fait la part belle à l’humour aujourd’hui : d’abord avec le film belge d’animation “Panique au village”, ensuite avec le nouveau film du cinéaste Terry Gilliam, l’ancien membre des Monty Python.
    Ils l’avaient promis, ils l’ont fait: à minuit, déjouant les règles du protocole, l’équipe de “Panique au village” est venue en tracteur devant le Palais du Festival.
    Les réalisateurs Vincent Patar et Stéphane Aubier étaient accompagnés de l’actrice française Jeanne Balibar, qui prête sa voix à un des personnages du film.
    A deux heures du matin, à l’issue de la projection, l’accueil est très enthousiaste, et les deux compères très émus.
    Trois acteurs différents
    “L’imaginarium du docteur Parnassus” de Terry Gilliam raconte comment une troupe de théâtre forain emmène le public dans un monde fantasmagorique, en traversant un miroir magique. Mais Le tournage du film a été interrompu par la mort d’un de ses acteurs, l’Australien Heath Ledger.
    “On a discuté longtemps pour voir si un acteur pouvait reprendre le rôle, mais ça me semblait impossible et irrespectueux vis-à-vis de Heath, et grâce au miroir magique dans le film, qu’il traverse trois fois, je me suis dit : Ok ! Prenons trois acteurs différents ! Ce sera beaucoup plus intéressant et plus surprenant !”, explique Terry Gilliam.
    Johnny Depp, Jude Law et Colin Farrell ont aidé Terry Gilliam à finir son film. C’est aussi ça, la magie du cinéma.
    (Notre envoyé spécial à Cannes Hugues Dayez)

  4. adminon 24 May 2009 at 14:30

    http://www.rtbf.be/info/societe/cinema/grand-jour-ce-jeudi-a-cannes-pour-panique-au-village-109928

    Grand jour ce jeudi à Cannes pour “Panique au village”
    20.05.09 – 15:55 C’est ce jeudi 21 mai à la séance de minuit que sera projeté en avant-première mondiale le premier long métrage des deux Belges Stéphane Aubier et Vincent Patar: “Panique au village”. La montée des marches par l’équipe du film pourrait être “spectaculaire”.
    “L’équipe planche sur une arrivée spectaculaire”. C’est ce qu’on peut lire sur le blog du tournage de “Panique au village”. Faut-il encore avoir le feu vert des services de protocole du festival, très stricte quand il s’agit de monter les marches du Palais des Festivals.
    On apprend également que toute l’équipe ayant participé au film sera présente à Cannes. Un bus a été spécialement affrété pour l’occasion. On devrait donc y retrouver Benoît Poelvoorde, Bouli Lanners, Frédéric Janin ou encore Jeanne Balibar.
    “Panique au village” est donc présenté à Cannes en sélection officielle, hors compétition, durant les séances de minuit. Une séance qui donne au film un label supplémentaire, celui d’oeuvre culte. C’est du moins ce qu’affirme Philippe Bober, le vendeur international du film belge, sur le blog.
    (C. Biourge)

  5. adminon 24 May 2009 at 15:11

    Jemp Thilges zu Cannes (5): Et geet zum Rescht

    Wärend dem ganze Festival vu Cannes ass de Filmkritiker Jemp Thilges op der Croisette, vu wou aus hien eis regelméisseg seng Impressiounen eraschéckt…

    Et ass Samschdeg op der Croisette an um zweetleschten Dag vum 62. Filmfestival ass iergendwéi d’Loft eraus. Déi gutt Filmer si gesinn, déi manner gutt ofgehaakt an déi grotteschlecht leider nach net vergiess.

    Den „Marché du Film” huet seng Koffere schonn zanter 2 Deeg gepaackt, am Lëtzebuerger Pavillon ass déi lescht Fläsch Rosé gekäppt ginn an, ausser dat mäi Frënd, de Jesus, dee bei enger Lëtzebuerger Filmproduktiounsfirma schafft, ausgerechnet op Christi Himmelfahrt virum Festivalspalais vun engem décken Hond an de Fouss gebass gouf an am Spidol gebutt huet misse ginn, gëtt et net méi ganz vill vu Cannes ze erzielen.

    Um Sonndegowend wäert d’Isabelle Huppert ons matdeelen, wat fir eng Filmer säi Jury als déi bescht vun engem Festival kréinen, deen ech perséinlech fir ee vun deene besseren aus menger 30järeger Carrière als Cannes-Freak bezeechne géif.

    Vum filmesche Standpunkt waren déi lescht Deeg vum Festival éischter eng Folter. Wirklech Positives ze erziele gëtt et eigentlech nemmen nach iwwer ee Film, dem Terry Gilliam säin zimlech geckegen a visuell staarken „The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus”, dee jo traureg berümt gouf, well den Schauspiller Heath Ledger wärend den Dréiaarbechten op tragesch Aart a Weis gestuerwen ass. Den Terry Gilliam, dee jo u Katastrofe bei sengen Tournage gewinnt ass, huet säi Problem op brillant Aart a Weis geléist, an deem en d’Roll vum Ledger vun 3 Frënn iwwerhuele gelooss huet – dem Johnny Depp, dem Jude Law an dem Colin Farrell. Dëse flotte Film, dee sécher zum Gilliam senge verréckteste Wierker gezielt ka ginn, ass hei zu Cannes „hors compétition” gewise ginn, gehéiert awer zu deene beschte Momenter vum Festival. E bëssen an déi selwecht Richtung geet och déi zweet Lëtzebuerger Koproduktioun „Panique au Village” vum Stéphane Aubier a Vincent Patar, déi „hors compétition” an enger Mëtternuechtviirstellung um Festival gewise gouf. Dësen duerchgedréinten Animationsfilm ass eng „histoire belge” wéi se am Buch steet, et gouf zimlech vill dobäi gelaacht an de Film ass sécher méi attraktiv wéi déi aner „Lëtzbuerger” Koprouktioun „Ne te retourne pas”. De Filmteam ass iwwregens mat engem rouden Trakter bis op de rouden Teppech beim Palais des Festivals gefuer.

    Déi lescht Filmer vun der „Compétitoun” konnte generell net méi iwwerzeegen. Zwar hat den Elia Suleiman mat sengem zimlech onstruktuéierten an autobiografeschen „The Time that remains” nach e puer Suporteren an et gouf an der Presseviirféierung och brav geklappt, mee esou gutt a komesch wéi säin „Divine Intervention” vu virun e puer Jore wor dëse Film op kee Fall. Och d’Isabelle Coixet, dat sech mat attraktive Wierker wéi „My Life without me”, „The Secret Life of Words” an „Elegy” e gudde Numm gemaach huet, konnt mat hirer tragescher Liebesgeschicht „Map of the Sounds of Tokyo” déi an der japanescher Haaptstad spillt, net wierklech iwwerzeegen. Eng regelrecht Kalamitéit, déi sech ongeféier um selwecht déiwen an iwwerhieflechen Niveau wéi dem Lars von Schrott sengem „Antichrist” ofspillt, ass dem Gaston Noé saïn 160 Minutte laange Calvaire „Enter the Void”, deen ongeféier esou attraktiv ass wéi wann een zwou an eng hallef Stonn beim Zänndokter Wuerzelen erausgebuert kritt. Mëttelalterlech Foltermethode waren bestëmmt net esou gräisslech wéi dëse sougenannten „film d’auteur”, mat deem mer um zweetleschten Dag vum Festival traktéiert goufen. Dem positiven Androck deen dëse Festival am Groussen a Ganzen gebueden huet, gëtt duerch esou eng gräisslech Kalamitéit natierlech net gehollef.

    Voilà, les dés sont jetés! An ech ginn Iech eng leschte Kéier Rendez-Vous vu Cannes fir e Méindeg op http://www.rtl.lu, wou ech dann hoffentlech e Palmarès kommentéiere kann, deen déi gutt Filmer priméiert an déi grotteschlecht dohinner schéckt, wou se higehéieren, nämlech an d’Land wou de Peffer wiist.
    Ah jo, vergiesst net, dëse Weekend dem Pedro Almodovar säin „Los embrazos rotos” an de Kino kucken ze goen…
    Live vun der Croisette
    Jemp Thilges

  6. adminon 28 May 2009 at 10:09

    Cinéma / 62e festival de Cannes
    http://le-jeudi.editpress.lu/Culture/1602.html

    Oubliés au palmarès ou présentés hors compétition, de nombreux films valaient cette année le détour à Cannes. Malgré quelques ratés, le festival 2009 s’est révélé d’une fort belle tenue./ Viviane Thill

    Oublié au palmarès, Looking for Eric de Ken Loach fut pourtant l’un des films les plus applaudis au festival de Cannes. Si ce n’est sans doute pas le chef-d’œuvre de son auteur, voilà néanmoins une comédie généreuse et débridée (dans un festival dominé par l’hémoglobine, cela fait du bien!), un tendre hommage aux «petites gens» comme les aime Loach et une savoureuse mise en scène du mythe Cantona avec la participation amusée de l’intéressé lui-même. Le film sortira bientôt sur nos écrans, on y reviendra donc!

    Plus désespéré, Elias Suleiman emprunte dans The Time That Remains les habits du clown triste pour raconter l’histoire de son pays, la Palestine, et de sa famille installée en Israël.
    Depuis 1948, quand son père défendait sa terre, jusqu’en 1970, 1980 et finalement aujourd’hui, il suit, en jouant plus sur les symboles, les petits gestes et les détails du quotidien que sur la reconstruction historique, l’évolution d’une situation qui n’a fait qu’empirer.
    Très inspiré par son histoire personnelle, The Time That Remains est, après le plus drôle Intervention divine, le film où Suleiman se souvient. Il se souvient du courage des Palestiniens, de la résignation de son père, de l’impasse où tout cela a mené. Et puis, il saute. Il fait – littéralement – le mur, celui qui sépare Israël de la Cisjordanie.

    le fil du rasoir

    Comme si, quand tout espoir semble perdu, le cinéma pouvait encore résister à sa façon. Quasiment muet, rythmé par les chansons qu’écoutaient ses parents jusqu’à celles au son desquelles danse aujourd’hui la jeunesse palestinienne, le film avance sur le fil du rasoir, entre humour à la Tati et désespoir. Il y a ainsi des cinéastes qui ont des choses à dire et les disent presque en chuchotant, ce qui fait qu’on tend l’oreille.
    D’autres n’ont pas grand-chose à exprimer mais utilisent pour cela grands moyens et images choc. C’est le cas de Gaspar Noé, celui qui nous avait déjà donné le nauséeux Irrésistible.
    Dans son nouveau film, assez pompeusement intitulé Enter the Void, il suit – en caméra subjective, ce qui fait qu’on ne le voit qu’une fois dans le miroir – un jeune drogué (15 minutes d’images psychédéliques sont censées nous donner à voir ce qu’il ressent après avoir pris des stupéfiants) qui se fait abattre par les flics, sort de son corps et plane durant deux heures au-dessus de Tokyo tandis qu’en bas, dans la vraie vie, sa sœur se désespère, veut mourir, avorte (gros plan sur le fœtus) et finit par faire un autre enfant.
    La lumière, qui clignote durant tout le film, et la musique provoquent un état hypnotique contre lequel le spectateur a du mal à se défendre. Mais si le film ne manque pas d’audaces formelles qu’on peut trouver intéressantes, il tourne très vite à vide et n’évite nullement le ridicule quand le protagoniste se réincarne à la fin dans le bébé qu’est en train de faire sa sœur.

    Jeux de miroir

    Dans un genre et une approche du cinéma diamétralement opposés, et déjà sur nos écrans, Étreintes brisées est un film comme on l’attend de Pedro Almodovar: plein de couleurs, de mélodrame et de tragédie. C’est peut-être ce qui explique son absence au palmarès car, bien que très beau, très bien raconté et merveilleusement interprété par la divine Penélope Cruz, Étreintes brisées n’apporte pas vraiment quelque chose de neuf à l’univers d’Almodovar. Ce qui ne devrait empêcher personne de se plonger, et de se perdre, dans cette histoire où un scénariste aveugle se souvient de la femme qu’il a follement aimée jadis.
    Jeu de miroir entre la vie et la fiction, hommage au cinéma qu’aime le réalisateur et surtout un rôle émouvant offert une nouvelle fois à son égérie Penélope Cruz: c’est toute la beauté, mais aussi peut-être la limite de l’art d’Almodovar qui se reflète ici.
    Tout aussi coloré est le monde curieusement refermé sur lui-même (au point que les personnages semblent toujours revenir au même point de départ après avoir pourtant beaucoup couru, roulé ou nagé!), qu’ont inventé Vincent Patar et Stéphane Aubier dans Panique au village (coproduit au Luxembourg par Mélusine Productions) mais ici on est dans le domaine de l’imaginaire enfantin, celui où tout est permis!
    Utilisant des figurines en plastique trouvées sur les marchés aux puces, les deux réalisateurs avaient d’abord imaginé une série d’animation pour la télévision belge et viennent donc d’y ajouter Panique au village – le film.
    Tout commence quand Cowboy et Indien, tous deux pas très futés, veulent faire un cadeau d’anniversaire à leur copain Cheval. Mais l’histoire en soi n’a ici guère d’importance. Dans des décors joyeusement inventifs, le film fait se succéder des saynètes toutes plus débridées les unes que les autres.
    On peut être rétif à ce genre d’animation hyper-agitée, avançant à une vitesse folle, les figurines (pourtant assez raides par elles-mêmes) étant toujours en train de bouger et les personnages criant fort tout le temps. Mais les fans de la série y trouveront leur bonheur et Panique au village a bel et bien le potentiel pour devenir un film culte.

Trackback URI | Comments RSS

Leave a Reply