Apr 15 2010

DUST in Copenhagen

Published by at 01:18 under Festival

SOURCE: http://www.cphpix.dk/n/a2.lasso?tt=f&s=2010003&ser=982&e=1

Today starts CPH PIX in Copenhagen. DUST by Max Jacoby will be screened several times:

Adam meets Eve in Max Jacobi’s bold debut feature ‘Dust’, which does away with all sense of time and place. Elodie and Elias are twins aged around 16 and they live in an undefined postwar period. They live together in a luxurious villa, which is slowly in the process of being swallowed by the surrounding forests. They pick fruit from the trees in the garden, bathe naked in the river – and generally live their days as if they had moved back to the garden of Eden and forgotten everything about needs and desires. But when a stranger Gabriel appears on their doorstep, the pure and innocent relationship between the siblings is put to the test. With beautiful and slow images, Jacoby depicts the remnants of a civilisation that is in the process of disappearing, while possibly a new one is making its appearance. The three protagonists rarely talk, in spite of the escalating drama between them, but nonetheless the film manages to depict both fragility, love and the budding sexuality of the two protagonists – while it frames it within a post-apocalyptic vision of a transitional world, where everything is new, and time is out of joint.

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SOURCE: http://www.cphpix.dk/n/a2.lasso?tt=f&s=2010003&ser=982&e=1

Today starts CPH PIX in Copenhagen. DUST by Max Jacoby will be screened several times:

Adam meets Eve in Max Jacobi’s bold debut feature ‘Dust’, which does away with all sense of time and place. Elodie and Elias are twins aged around 16 and they live in an undefined postwar period. They live together in a luxurious villa, which is slowly in the process of being swallowed by the surrounding forests. They pick fruit from the trees in the garden, bathe naked in the river – and generally live their days as if they had moved back to the garden of Eden and forgotten everything about needs and desires. But when a stranger Gabriel appears on their doorstep, the pure and innocent relationship between the siblings is put to the test. With beautiful and slow images, Jacoby depicts the remnants of a civilisation that is in the process of disappearing, while possibly a new one is making its appearance. The three protagonists rarely talk, in spite of the escalating drama between them, but nonetheless the film manages to depict both fragility, love and the budding sexuality of the two protagonists – while it frames it within a post-apocalyptic vision of a transitional world, where everything is new, and time is out of joint.

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