Sep 30 2009

DUST in Pusan International Film Festival

Published by at 01:00 under Festival

Selected in the only competitive and non-asian “Flash Forward” section, Max Jacoby’s Dust will be screened at the 14th PUSAN International Film Festival in South Korea on October 13th and 14th.

SOURCE: www.piff.org

Dust Max Jacoby

Shall we call it an ‘Apocalyptic version’ of Jules et Jim, which reminds us of the visual and auditory quality of silent films? The general tone of the film is actually quite contrasting. As opposed to how Truffaut’s masterpiece focuses its weight in the unregulated love triangle of the main characters, the film maintains the silent tone as it pours effort into capturing and expressing the space and environment surrounding the characters.
Elodie and Elias are living in peace after the end of the world. One day, a mysterious man Gabriel appears and creates a rift between them. It almost seems to turn into a stimulating drama about a love triangle, but the film consistently maintains its minimalism and revivalism – especially in the expression of the relationship between the three characters, as well as other individuals. The characters seldom speak to each other. Their thoughts are portrayed, not through words, but through a minimum amount of gestures and expressions. At times up close and at times from afar, the camera fixes on the characters, the space they occupy, or even empty space. The aesthetic sense, lighting, and sound effects all contribute to the minimalism and revivalism.

Max JACOBY
Max Jacoby is from Luxembourg. He graduated from the London International Film School with his first film, Babysitting. He made two more short films, the last of which, Butterflies, won the Prix UIP for Best European Short Film at the 2005 Venice Film Festival. Dust is his first feature film.

The FLASH FORWARD Section
If ‘New Currents’ section has existed to discover new directors throughout Asia, including Korea, then ‘Flash Forward’ has existed to excavate new talent in non-Asian areas, by carefully selecting and introducing new artists’ first or second feature films. Now in its third year, ‘Flash Forward’ has made a shocking come back this year. In order to incite further artistic discovery and to expand PIFF inside and out, it has transformed itself into a competitive section. The winner will be selected by three judges and take home $20,000. With the launch of this competition, invitation and presentation requirements became harder. All those invited must be international premiers or higher. It’s commonly believed that in order to stick to the rule of having to be a ‘premier,’ the level of competition must suffer. This is partly true, but partly wrong. It’s true that strict rules do cause relinquishment of certain films, but that has not forced us to include films that do not meet certain standards this film festival requires. Aside from having changed faces as a competition, the 2009 ‘Flash Forward’ attracts our attention in other regards. First, the newcomer’s ability has made much progress. This progress is not limited to a certain area in a certain country. Though there are a few areas including Africa that are not represented, the generally even distribution of improvement is certainly noteworthy.

This even distribution is also apparent in the quality of the films themselves. All eleven pieces can hold their own against any prominent film from the world cinema section. That the ‘young’ in the ‘young director’ supported by ‘Flash Forward’ is not limited to just age itself is also one of the unique aspects. That’s one reason why Director Renen Shorr, who is in his late 50s and announced his second full feature film in twenty years, was not excluded from the competition because of his age. This decision was made after careful consideration and coincides well with this generation’s trend to push against age limits.

In the 2009 ‘Flash Forward’, different countries will exhibit an assortment of talent from many new directors- from mature refinement to refreshing experimentations. On the one hand we will see films that walk traditional plot lines, but still supply quite a bit of fun (Kino Caravan, Cosmonaut), and films that stand out because of their experimental techniques in narrative structures (Zero, Chicago Heights) on the other side. There are films that carefully detail the characters’ personalities and relationships (The Loners, The Frost, Last Cowboy Standing, Miss Kicki), and films that are memorable because of their unique aura and are not easy to express in words (Dust, Magma). There’s also the film (Bridges) which presents a big omission and a deep aftertaste. We trust that the variety itself will draw much attention. We formally invite you to this small but ambitious section. – JEON Chanil

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Selected in the only competitive and non-asian “Flash Forward” section, Max Jacoby’s Dust will be screened at the 14th PUSAN International Film Festival in South Korea on October 13th and 14th.

SOURCE: www.piff.org

Dust Max Jacoby

Shall we call it an ‘Apocalyptic version’ of Jules et Jim, which reminds us of the visual and auditory quality of silent films? The general tone of the film is actually quite contrasting. As opposed to how Truffaut’s masterpiece focuses its weight in the unregulated love triangle of the main characters, the film maintains the silent tone as it pours effort into capturing and expressing the space and environment surrounding the characters.
Elodie and Elias are living in peace after the end of the world. One day, a mysterious man Gabriel appears and creates a rift between them. It almost seems to turn into a stimulating drama about a love triangle, but the film consistently maintains its minimalism and revivalism – especially in the expression of the relationship between the three characters, as well as other individuals. The characters seldom speak to each other. Their thoughts are portrayed, not through words, but through a minimum amount of gestures and expressions. At times up close and at times from afar, the camera fixes on the characters, the space they occupy, or even empty space. The aesthetic sense, lighting, and sound effects all contribute to the minimalism and revivalism.

Max JACOBY
Max Jacoby is from Luxembourg. He graduated from the London International Film School with his first film, Babysitting. He made two more short films, the last of which, Butterflies, won the Prix UIP for Best European Short Film at the 2005 Venice Film Festival. Dust is his first feature film.

The FLASH FORWARD Section
If ‘New Currents’ section has existed to discover new directors throughout Asia, including Korea, then ‘Flash Forward’ has existed to excavate new talent in non-Asian areas, by carefully selecting and introducing new artists’ first or second feature films. Now in its third year, ‘Flash Forward’ has made a shocking come back this year. In order to incite further artistic discovery and to expand PIFF inside and out, it has transformed itself into a competitive section. The winner will be selected by three judges and take home $20,000. With the launch of this competition, invitation and presentation requirements became harder. All those invited must be international premiers or higher. It’s commonly believed that in order to stick to the rule of having to be a ‘premier,’ the level of competition must suffer. This is partly true, but partly wrong. It’s true that strict rules do cause relinquishment of certain films, but that has not forced us to include films that do not meet certain standards this film festival requires. Aside from having changed faces as a competition, the 2009 ‘Flash Forward’ attracts our attention in other regards. First, the newcomer’s ability has made much progress. This progress is not limited to a certain area in a certain country. Though there are a few areas including Africa that are not represented, the generally even distribution of improvement is certainly noteworthy.

This even distribution is also apparent in the quality of the films themselves. All eleven pieces can hold their own against any prominent film from the world cinema section. That the ‘young’ in the ‘young director’ supported by ‘Flash Forward’ is not limited to just age itself is also one of the unique aspects. That’s one reason why Director Renen Shorr, who is in his late 50s and announced his second full feature film in twenty years, was not excluded from the competition because of his age. This decision was made after careful consideration and coincides well with this generation’s trend to push against age limits.

In the 2009 ‘Flash Forward’, different countries will exhibit an assortment of talent from many new directors- from mature refinement to refreshing experimentations. On the one hand we will see films that walk traditional plot lines, but still supply quite a bit of fun (Kino Caravan, Cosmonaut), and films that stand out because of their experimental techniques in narrative structures (Zero, Chicago Heights) on the other side. There are films that carefully detail the characters’ personalities and relationships (The Loners, The Frost, Last Cowboy Standing, Miss Kicki), and films that are memorable because of their unique aura and are not easy to express in words (Dust, Magma). There’s also the film (Bridges) which presents a big omission and a deep aftertaste. We trust that the variety itself will draw much attention. We formally invite you to this small but ambitious section. – JEON Chanil

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