Oct 12 2009

Dust to premiere in Pusan

Published by at 12:59 under Festival

source: http://cineuropa.org/

The feature film debut of London-schooled Luxembourg director Max JacobyDust, will have its world premiere at the Pusan International Film Festival. The largest South Korean film festival starts today in the eponymous port city. Dust will have its official screenings on October 13 and 14.

dust-photo-1

Jacoby, who graduated from the London Film School in 2001 with the short Babysitting, became one of Luxembourg’s hottest young directors with his 2005 short film Butterflies. The film, adapted from an Ian McEwan short story that also inspired a short by German director Wolfgang Becker, won the UIP Venezia award at the Venice Film Festival and was nominated for a European Film Award.

His long-awaited feature debut, Dust, is an English-language production filmed with Luxembourg money and on location in Luxembourg, which fills in for an unknown (though Mitteleuropa-looking) location.

Its story is set in an indefinite time, when most of humanity seems to have either died or disappeared. Two siblings, played by British thespians Olly Alexander and Catherine Steadman, live a life of relative tranquillity in a large house in the abandoned countryside. Their daily routine is disturbed when another human being (Andrew Hawley) suddenly shows up.

The screenplay, also written by Jacoby, is light on explanations and dialogue, and the director and Swedish cinematographer Fredrik Bäckar keep the camera moving to a fault. Nonetheless, the film derives some clear visceral power from its intriguing and carefully created atmospheres, its subtle gestures and the unspoken that lies just underneath the apparently calm surface.

The film was produced by Pol Cruchten and Jeanne Geiben for local outfit Red Lion, in co-production with Austrian production company KGP Kranzelbinder Gabriele Production. It was backed by Luxembourg Film Fund.

In Pusan, Dust will be presented in the Flash Forward section that showcases first and second films of promising new talents from outside Asia. The film will be released in Luxembourg in November.

—————-

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com

New award, prize set for rising director

Flash Forward to be given at PIFF closing ceremony

By Karen Chu

BUSAN — Young non-Asian directors have a new friend at the Pusan International Film Festival.

A new Flash Forward award and a cash price of $20,000 will be given to one of the 11 features by emerging directors from Europe, South America, North America and the Middle East at the PIFF closing ceremony on Oct. 16.

Aimed to showcase the first or second features of non-Asian directors since 2007 as the “New Currents” has for Asian directors, the “Flash Forward” section this year includes selections from Argentina, Italy, Norway, Romania, Israel, Poland, Luxembourg and Canada.

“It’s important for festivals to have sections and awards for first and second movies, as it lets new filmmakers compete on the same level,” said Italian director Susanna Nicchiarelli, who is at PIFF with her debut feature “Cosmonaut,” a Cold War era coming-of-age story about an Italian girl’s obsession with the Soviet space program. The film, which is set between 1957-1963, won two prizes at the Venice International Film Festival in September.

French director Pierre Vinour, in Pusan for the world premiere of his first feature “Magma,” said the local Korean audience might see the common root between his intense drama and Korean cinema. “The film is not typically French, and it showed my affinity for Asian cinema,” Vinour said. “The Flash Forward award is great because it presents new filmmakers to an Asian audience.”

“It’s a chance for new directors to establish themselves,” said Julian Giulianelli, an Argentinean first-time director presenting in Pusan “Bridges,” the tragic misadventure of three trouble-making kids in the outskirts of Bueno Aires.

The Flash Forward award contenders also include “The Loners” by Israelite Renen Schorr, “Chicago Heights” by Canadian Daniel Nearing, “Dust” by Luxembourg helmer Max Jacoby, “Kino Caravan” by Romanian Titus Muntean, “Last Cowboy Standing” by Czechoslovakian Zaida Bergroth, “Miss Kicki” by Norwegian Håkon Liu, “The Frost” by Spaniard Ferran Audí, and “Zero” by Polish director Pawel Borowski.

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source: http://cineuropa.org/

The feature film debut of London-schooled Luxembourg director Max JacobyDust, will have its world premiere at the Pusan International Film Festival. The largest South Korean film festival starts today in the eponymous port city. Dust will have its official screenings on October 13 and 14.

dust-photo-1

Jacoby, who graduated from the London Film School in 2001 with the short Babysitting, became one of Luxembourg’s hottest young directors with his 2005 short film Butterflies. The film, adapted from an Ian McEwan short story that also inspired a short by German director Wolfgang Becker, won the UIP Venezia award at the Venice Film Festival and was nominated for a European Film Award.

His long-awaited feature debut, Dust, is an English-language production filmed with Luxembourg money and on location in Luxembourg, which fills in for an unknown (though Mitteleuropa-looking) location.

Its story is set in an indefinite time, when most of humanity seems to have either died or disappeared. Two siblings, played by British thespians Olly Alexander and Catherine Steadman, live a life of relative tranquillity in a large house in the abandoned countryside. Their daily routine is disturbed when another human being (Andrew Hawley) suddenly shows up.

The screenplay, also written by Jacoby, is light on explanations and dialogue, and the director and Swedish cinematographer Fredrik Bäckar keep the camera moving to a fault. Nonetheless, the film derives some clear visceral power from its intriguing and carefully created atmospheres, its subtle gestures and the unspoken that lies just underneath the apparently calm surface.

The film was produced by Pol Cruchten and Jeanne Geiben for local outfit Red Lion, in co-production with Austrian production company KGP Kranzelbinder Gabriele Production. It was backed by Luxembourg Film Fund.

In Pusan, Dust will be presented in the Flash Forward section that showcases first and second films of promising new talents from outside Asia. The film will be released in Luxembourg in November.

—————-

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com

New award, prize set for rising director

Flash Forward to be given at PIFF closing ceremony

By Karen Chu

BUSAN — Young non-Asian directors have a new friend at the Pusan International Film Festival.

A new Flash Forward award and a cash price of $20,000 will be given to one of the 11 features by emerging directors from Europe, South America, North America and the Middle East at the PIFF closing ceremony on Oct. 16.

Aimed to showcase the first or second features of non-Asian directors since 2007 as the “New Currents” has for Asian directors, the “Flash Forward” section this year includes selections from Argentina, Italy, Norway, Romania, Israel, Poland, Luxembourg and Canada.

“It’s important for festivals to have sections and awards for first and second movies, as it lets new filmmakers compete on the same level,” said Italian director Susanna Nicchiarelli, who is at PIFF with her debut feature “Cosmonaut,” a Cold War era coming-of-age story about an Italian girl’s obsession with the Soviet space program. The film, which is set between 1957-1963, won two prizes at the Venice International Film Festival in September.

French director Pierre Vinour, in Pusan for the world premiere of his first feature “Magma,” said the local Korean audience might see the common root between his intense drama and Korean cinema. “The film is not typically French, and it showed my affinity for Asian cinema,” Vinour said. “The Flash Forward award is great because it presents new filmmakers to an Asian audience.”

“It’s a chance for new directors to establish themselves,” said Julian Giulianelli, an Argentinean first-time director presenting in Pusan “Bridges,” the tragic misadventure of three trouble-making kids in the outskirts of Bueno Aires.

The Flash Forward award contenders also include “The Loners” by Israelite Renen Schorr, “Chicago Heights” by Canadian Daniel Nearing, “Dust” by Luxembourg helmer Max Jacoby, “Kino Caravan” by Romanian Titus Muntean, “Last Cowboy Standing” by Czechoslovakian Zaida Bergroth, “Miss Kicki” by Norwegian Håkon Liu, “The Frost” by Spaniard Ferran Audí, and “Zero” by Polish director Pawel Borowski.

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