Sep 16 2013

The Strange Colour – Toronto Review

Published by at 00:20 under Festival,Red Lion

SOURCE: http://www.filmcolossus.com

What It’s Good For:
-Giallo for the 21st Century, y’all
-Crazy visuals, colors
-Inventive death scenes
-A lesson in perceptions and perspectives
-An examination of the sexual pressures of relationships
-Disproving any asshole who says the horror genre is dead
-ESCALATION (in narratives)
-Proving film school is fucking fantastic
-Inventive cinematography and shot selection that’s actually psychologically relevant to the situation

Potential Pitfalls:
-You’re prone to seizures
-You don’t like movies where every shot means something
-You think anyone trying to ape Argento or Bava is the devil
-You thought O for Orgasm was the worst part of The ABCs of Death
-Attaching the mystery to the love story might seem overused

Scouting Report:
I don’t think I can win here. I looooooooove The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears. Love. I’m in love, you guys. I’m not fucking around. I think it’s one of the best horror movies I’ve ever seen. And when people hear me say that, they’ll probably say, “You haven’t seen enough Giallo,” to which I’ll respond, “It’s all I watched for about a solid year of my life,” to which they’ll respond, “Well, you don’t know what good Giallo is.”

Maybe I don’t? Maybe I’ve been viewing the genre wrong. I think Suspiria is one of the greatest movies ever made (although I also love Opera, so can you really trust me?). Bava, Argento, Guerrini, Fulci, Lenzi—of course they’re all fucking great. But I’m really not of the belief that Giallo is a irredeemable art form at this point, just like I don’t believe found footage is a dead genre (see The Sacrament). And Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani are living proof of that.

I wish I could really delve more into what makes this movie so great. I mean, I can, and I will, it will just have to come in the form of a more extensive analysis. Touching on all of the insanity of Cattet and Forzani’s shot selection and editing into a formal analysis is going to take a lot of organizational skills and headaches on my part.

And, as I’ve noticed from some Internet research, this seems to be people’s problem with the directing duo: there’s too much going on. Recently a friend complained to me about Only God Forgives, complaining about the profound nature behind every shot, saying, “When everything is important, nothing is important.” Ed Gonzalez complained about Cattet and Forzani’s Amer, writing, “…everything means something…you wonder if Freud would have had a field day with all of this or if it would have simply given him a headache.” You wonder? You know what I wonder: why is that a bad thing? If every shot means something…doesn’t that mean the film medium is being used to its fullest extent? If it’s not compromising its psychological intentions, and in fact enhancing the characters’ psyches, isn’t that point counterproductive?

You know what that statement really means? “I don’t want to do this much work to figure a movie out.” I, on the other hand, welcome such a challenge. The other argument discourages filmmakers from taking the myriad of chances on display in Strange Colour, and that’s not OK. That’s not what we want. Every shot in Strange Colour is essential in marking progression, growth, and complication within each character. It’s exploring the sexual pressures couples place on one another, and taking those pressures to the absolute fucking nth level. And it makes me so happy that this amount of hard work has the potential to reinvigorate a genre.

Will You See It:
It’s making its rounds on the festival circuit, just like Amer did. This sort of film won’t make it to many U.S. theaters (and that’s too bad).

People:
Directors/Writers:
-Hélène Cattet
-Bruno Forzani

Cast:
-Klaus Tange
-Ursula Bedena
-oe Koener
-Birgit Yew
-Hans de Munter
-Anna D’Annunzio
-Jean-Michel Vovk
-Manon Beuchot

Producers:
-François Cognard
-Eve Commenge

Co-Producers:
-Pol Cruchten
-Jeanne Geiben
-Eurydice Gysel
-Koen Mortier
-Guy van Baelen
-Wilfried van Baelen

Production Companies:
-Anonymes Films
-Tobina Film Epidemic
-Red Lion Sarl
-Mollywood
-Centre du Cinéma et de l’Audiovisuel de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles
-VOO
-Canal+
-Ciné+
-BE TV
-Belgacom
-Fonds Film in Vlaanderen
-Fonds National de Soutien à la Production Audiovisuelle du Luxembourg
-Indéfilms
-Le Tax Shelter du Gouvernement Fédéral de Belgique
-Go West Invest

Distribution Companies:
-Shellac Distribution
-Bac Films

Comments

comments

SOURCE: http://www.filmcolossus.com

What It’s Good For:
-Giallo for the 21st Century, y’all
-Crazy visuals, colors
-Inventive death scenes
-A lesson in perceptions and perspectives
-An examination of the sexual pressures of relationships
-Disproving any asshole who says the horror genre is dead
-ESCALATION (in narratives)
-Proving film school is fucking fantastic
-Inventive cinematography and shot selection that’s actually psychologically relevant to the situation

Potential Pitfalls:
-You’re prone to seizures
-You don’t like movies where every shot means something
-You think anyone trying to ape Argento or Bava is the devil
-You thought O for Orgasm was the worst part of The ABCs of Death
-Attaching the mystery to the love story might seem overused

Scouting Report:
I don’t think I can win here. I looooooooove The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears. Love. I’m in love, you guys. I’m not fucking around. I think it’s one of the best horror movies I’ve ever seen. And when people hear me say that, they’ll probably say, “You haven’t seen enough Giallo,” to which I’ll respond, “It’s all I watched for about a solid year of my life,” to which they’ll respond, “Well, you don’t know what good Giallo is.”

Maybe I don’t? Maybe I’ve been viewing the genre wrong. I think Suspiria is one of the greatest movies ever made (although I also love Opera, so can you really trust me?). Bava, Argento, Guerrini, Fulci, Lenzi—of course they’re all fucking great. But I’m really not of the belief that Giallo is a irredeemable art form at this point, just like I don’t believe found footage is a dead genre (see The Sacrament). And Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani are living proof of that.

I wish I could really delve more into what makes this movie so great. I mean, I can, and I will, it will just have to come in the form of a more extensive analysis. Touching on all of the insanity of Cattet and Forzani’s shot selection and editing into a formal analysis is going to take a lot of organizational skills and headaches on my part.

And, as I’ve noticed from some Internet research, this seems to be people’s problem with the directing duo: there’s too much going on. Recently a friend complained to me about Only God Forgives, complaining about the profound nature behind every shot, saying, “When everything is important, nothing is important.” Ed Gonzalez complained about Cattet and Forzani’s Amer, writing, “…everything means something…you wonder if Freud would have had a field day with all of this or if it would have simply given him a headache.” You wonder? You know what I wonder: why is that a bad thing? If every shot means something…doesn’t that mean the film medium is being used to its fullest extent? If it’s not compromising its psychological intentions, and in fact enhancing the characters’ psyches, isn’t that point counterproductive?

You know what that statement really means? “I don’t want to do this much work to figure a movie out.” I, on the other hand, welcome such a challenge. The other argument discourages filmmakers from taking the myriad of chances on display in Strange Colour, and that’s not OK. That’s not what we want. Every shot in Strange Colour is essential in marking progression, growth, and complication within each character. It’s exploring the sexual pressures couples place on one another, and taking those pressures to the absolute fucking nth level. And it makes me so happy that this amount of hard work has the potential to reinvigorate a genre.

Will You See It:
It’s making its rounds on the festival circuit, just like Amer did. This sort of film won’t make it to many U.S. theaters (and that’s too bad).

People:
Directors/Writers:
-Hélène Cattet
-Bruno Forzani

Cast:
-Klaus Tange
-Ursula Bedena
-oe Koener
-Birgit Yew
-Hans de Munter
-Anna D’Annunzio
-Jean-Michel Vovk
-Manon Beuchot

Producers:
-François Cognard
-Eve Commenge

Co-Producers:
-Pol Cruchten
-Jeanne Geiben
-Eurydice Gysel
-Koen Mortier
-Guy van Baelen
-Wilfried van Baelen

Production Companies:
-Anonymes Films
-Tobina Film Epidemic
-Red Lion Sarl
-Mollywood
-Centre du Cinéma et de l’Audiovisuel de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles
-VOO
-Canal+
-Ciné+
-BE TV
-Belgacom
-Fonds Film in Vlaanderen
-Fonds National de Soutien à la Production Audiovisuelle du Luxembourg
-Indéfilms
-Le Tax Shelter du Gouvernement Fédéral de Belgique
-Go West Invest

Distribution Companies:
-Shellac Distribution
-Bac Films

Comments

comments

No responses yet

Comments are closed at this time.

Trackback URI |