Aug 24 2009

Morgenrot in New York Times

Published by at 08:30 under Music,Newsdesk

SOURCE: http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/21/must-16/

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Must See: Videos Worth Watching
“Hauschka – Morgenrot” (03:36)

I am entranced by this video created by 25-year-old Jeff Desom, who is based in London, set to the haunting music of Hauschka (the alias of Volker Bertelmann, an experimental composer and pianist). An earlier collaboration between the two concerned a composer plagued by writer’s block. “Morgenrot” is Mr. Desom’s vision of that composer’s recurring dream, in which a burning, falling piano represents the promise of creative revelation.

“I wanted to see how far you can emulate old footage,” Mr. Desom said about recreating a New York City of the 1920s in which an upright piano is pushed from the ledge of a skyscraper. For a year, he studied period postcards from flea markets and photographs from the Library of Congress, which he then used as the building blocks for his animation. To create the aesthetic, he used Photoshop and After Effects. When asked how he achieved the animated smoke, Mr. Desom paused before saying politely, “That’s a secret I don’t want to share.”

Falling pianos are “somehow part of cinematic language,” Mr. Desom said. They certainly are now. (K.B.)

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SOURCE: http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/21/must-16/

new york times logo

Must See: Videos Worth Watching
“Hauschka – Morgenrot” (03:36)

I am entranced by this video created by 25-year-old Jeff Desom, who is based in London, set to the haunting music of Hauschka (the alias of Volker Bertelmann, an experimental composer and pianist). An earlier collaboration between the two concerned a composer plagued by writer’s block. “Morgenrot” is Mr. Desom’s vision of that composer’s recurring dream, in which a burning, falling piano represents the promise of creative revelation.

“I wanted to see how far you can emulate old footage,” Mr. Desom said about recreating a New York City of the 1920s in which an upright piano is pushed from the ledge of a skyscraper. For a year, he studied period postcards from flea markets and photographs from the Library of Congress, which he then used as the building blocks for his animation. To create the aesthetic, he used Photoshop and After Effects. When asked how he achieved the animated smoke, Mr. Desom paused before saying politely, “That’s a secret I don’t want to share.”

Falling pianos are “somehow part of cinematic language,” Mr. Desom said. They certainly are now. (K.B.)

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