May 13 2013

Celebrating 20 years of films made in Luxembourg

Published by at 01:07 under PTD

SOURCE: http://www.wort.lu

Behind the Scenes of Paul Thiltges Distributions
(CS) Luxembourg film production and distribution company Paul Thiltges Distributions (PTD) is celebrating 20 years in 2013, a chance to look back on the company’s past and casting a glance into the future of films made in Luxembourg.

A founding member of Samsa Film in the 1980s, together with brother Jani and four other film aficionados, Paul Thiltges was responsible for bringing the films made by the Luxembourg production company to the market.

Moving into the field of animation with his own production company Monipoly in the 90s, Thiltges left Samsa to create Paul Thiltges Distributions in 1993, continuing to sell films made in Luxembourg.

With a production freeze at Monipoly following the distribution of widely successful children’s film “Kirikou et la sorcière”, PTD moved beyond distribution into the field of production, specialising in documentaries and animation. “All of a sudden, PTD did everything,” said Thiltges.

Making Luxembourg films accessible

For its anniversary year, PTD is returning to its distribution roots, following the creation of production company Juliette Films in early 2013, headed by Thiltges’s associate and producer David Grumbach.

At the same time, Thiltges himself is taking a back seat as producer after becoming a consultant at Luxembourg’s Film Fund, a national body supervising audiovisual production in the country, ensuring that government policy is implemented, and representing Luxembourg film abroad.


Paul Thiltges Photo: Vesna Andonovic

“For the next two years, I will focus on the Film Fund,” Thiltges explained. “We want to become more proactive,” he said. “We need to make the films we produce more accessible, in Luxembourg and abroad. We need to ensure that everyone who wants to see a film or buy it can do that.”

Some of the ideas Thiltges is developing with the Film Fund are an online database, including trailers or the possibility to stream films, as well as targeting international festivals more directly and increased cooperation with embassies abroad to promote the Grand Duchy’s film industry.

“We want films that suit us”

These efforts come at a time of stricter rules to secure funding through the Film Fund, as a new set of criteria is soon to be implemented. “We are still waiting for the details, but for the first time the market appeal of a project will be judged,” Thiltges outlined the new regulations. “Does the project stand a chance on the international market?”

However, there are no plans to produce the next big blockbuster in the Grand Duchy. “We want films that suit us,” said Thiltges, adding that films co-produced in Luxembourg usually clock in at a budget of between three to nine million euros.


David Grumbach Photo: Film Fund

A side effect of the regulations could be a move towards more English-language films, Thiltges speculated, adding that younger directors and producers were already increasingly veering towards the British and Irish market.

Celebrating in Cannes in 2013

PTD itself is set to make a big foray into the English-language market with The Congress, the new feature film by Waltz With Bashir director Ari Folman. The film, starring Hollywood heavy-weights Robin Wright and Paul Giamatti, will open the Directors’ Fortnight at the Cannes film festival in May.

To celebrate in Luxembourg, PTD is organising several special events throughout the year, including “Avant-Première” nights for the releases of its latest films. English-speaking film fans can stay tuned for the release of Standby, an Irish co-production and comedy starring Mad Men’s Jessica Paré and Brian Gleeson.

An anniversary party will follow in September, which will also see the release of a limited-edition DVD collection.

“It’s a modest celebration of 20 years in business,” Thiltges said. “It’s a long time.”

To keep up-to-date with the latest news from PTD and to find out more visit ptd.lu

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SOURCE: http://www.wort.lu

Behind the Scenes of Paul Thiltges Distributions
(CS) Luxembourg film production and distribution company Paul Thiltges Distributions (PTD) is celebrating 20 years in 2013, a chance to look back on the company’s past and casting a glance into the future of films made in Luxembourg.

A founding member of Samsa Film in the 1980s, together with brother Jani and four other film aficionados, Paul Thiltges was responsible for bringing the films made by the Luxembourg production company to the market.

Moving into the field of animation with his own production company Monipoly in the 90s, Thiltges left Samsa to create Paul Thiltges Distributions in 1993, continuing to sell films made in Luxembourg.

With a production freeze at Monipoly following the distribution of widely successful children’s film “Kirikou et la sorcière”, PTD moved beyond distribution into the field of production, specialising in documentaries and animation. “All of a sudden, PTD did everything,” said Thiltges.

Making Luxembourg films accessible

For its anniversary year, PTD is returning to its distribution roots, following the creation of production company Juliette Films in early 2013, headed by Thiltges’s associate and producer David Grumbach.

At the same time, Thiltges himself is taking a back seat as producer after becoming a consultant at Luxembourg’s Film Fund, a national body supervising audiovisual production in the country, ensuring that government policy is implemented, and representing Luxembourg film abroad.


Paul Thiltges Photo: Vesna Andonovic

“For the next two years, I will focus on the Film Fund,” Thiltges explained. “We want to become more proactive,” he said. “We need to make the films we produce more accessible, in Luxembourg and abroad. We need to ensure that everyone who wants to see a film or buy it can do that.”

Some of the ideas Thiltges is developing with the Film Fund are an online database, including trailers or the possibility to stream films, as well as targeting international festivals more directly and increased cooperation with embassies abroad to promote the Grand Duchy’s film industry.

“We want films that suit us”

These efforts come at a time of stricter rules to secure funding through the Film Fund, as a new set of criteria is soon to be implemented. “We are still waiting for the details, but for the first time the market appeal of a project will be judged,” Thiltges outlined the new regulations. “Does the project stand a chance on the international market?”

However, there are no plans to produce the next big blockbuster in the Grand Duchy. “We want films that suit us,” said Thiltges, adding that films co-produced in Luxembourg usually clock in at a budget of between three to nine million euros.


David Grumbach Photo: Film Fund

A side effect of the regulations could be a move towards more English-language films, Thiltges speculated, adding that younger directors and producers were already increasingly veering towards the British and Irish market.

Celebrating in Cannes in 2013

PTD itself is set to make a big foray into the English-language market with The Congress, the new feature film by Waltz With Bashir director Ari Folman. The film, starring Hollywood heavy-weights Robin Wright and Paul Giamatti, will open the Directors’ Fortnight at the Cannes film festival in May.

To celebrate in Luxembourg, PTD is organising several special events throughout the year, including “Avant-Première” nights for the releases of its latest films. English-speaking film fans can stay tuned for the release of Standby, an Irish co-production and comedy starring Mad Men’s Jessica Paré and Brian Gleeson.

An anniversary party will follow in September, which will also see the release of a limited-edition DVD collection.

“It’s a modest celebration of 20 years in business,” Thiltges said. “It’s a long time.”

To keep up-to-date with the latest news from PTD and to find out more visit ptd.lu

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